For more than 165 years, we have been writing the history of international boating.

Pietro Baglietto started his dream of founding the historic Shipyard. In the beginning, Baglietto specialized in small fishing boats, but then the Shipyard went into designing and building yachts.

1854
1854

The first racing boat sailed from the Shipyard.
Baglietto built Rosy, a 7.50-meter cutter created to become a legend.

1876
1876

Pope Leo XIII was gifted with La Barchetta, a boat commissioned to the Shipyard by a group of Genoese nobles. In the same year, the unbeatable Iole was built.

1888
1888

The Shipyard arrived first to another finish line.
After being modified, the competition yacht Miss Mary became a regatta champion. The first one of a long series of winning streaks.

1891
1891

New Century: The Shipyard dropped the anchor for the construction of a legend

In 1906 the Shipyard built Giuseppina, the most significant cruising yacht in Italy with an “explosion engine,” a length of 22.60 meters, and a weight of 33 tons. In the same year, the Shipyard began the construction of the first hydrofoil boat in the world.

1906
1906

Bernardo Baglietto succeeded to his father, Pietro. The Baglietto legacy continues.

1911
1911

The Shipyards engaged in government orders.
With the start of the First World War, the Shipyard adjusts its production line. Baglietto produces for the Marina Regia seaplanes and the MAS, a sea-worthy anti-submarine armed motorboat. The name of this boat inspired D’Annunzio to write his motto, “Memento Audere Semper.”

1915
1915

Several pleasure boats built for outstanding personalities take off.
Buyers include the Spanish King Alfonso XIII, Guglielmo Marconi, Umberto II, and even Puccini with his Cio Cio San, and D’Annunzio with Alcyone.

1923
1923

From Vittorio Baglietto’s hand comes La Spina, the first 12-meter yacht ever built in Italy. It was known for its detailed finishes and the cutting-edge technology used onboard.

1929
1929

The legendary MAS breaks another record, 50 knots of speed. The boat project was reviewed to improve its performance and technology onboard.

1937
1937

Baglietto, an evolving Shipyard.
Thanks to the collaboration with the Italian army, the Seagull brand makes a vital technology evolution. Caroly, a 22.6-meter yawl, is an example.

1948
1948

Pietro Baglietto Junior arrives to guide the Shipyard on a new route.
Like his grandfather, Pietro, and his uncle, Pietro Junior was passionate about design. He signs RORC Lanzerota, a III class boat, elegant with a cutting-edge look.

1951
1951

Baglietto keeps winning with Twins VI wins the “Coppa d’Italia” in Helsinki and then in Genova. With Twins II triumphs in Sandhamn (Sweden), gaining the “Coppa Oro,” and the “Coppa di Francia” in Gineva.

1953-1956
1953 - 1956

New production techniques.
Baglietto introduces marine plywood and develops new production techniques. An emblematic case is that of the Flying Bridge: a crucial structural innovation that allows shipowners and his/her guests to take full advantage of the boat’s roof, and it increases performance.

1960s
Dagli anni ‘60
Showcasing its legacy
with the wooden series.

The islands of the Mediterranean Sea inspired the wooden boat series: Elba of 11.50 meters, Ischia and Capri of 14 meters, Minorca of 20 meters, and Mallorca of 22 meters.

Toward New Horizons:
The Aluminum Years

The vessels’ performance improves thanks to the technology onboard and better design. The motor yacht Chato (26 meters) with water jet propulsion, reaches 62.50 knots of speed; and the 18-meter, 16.50 meter, and 20-meter numerical series yachts are also equipped with cutting-edge technological solutions such as hydrodynamics and planning hulls that guarantee fantastic performance.

1970s
1970s
Baglietto reaches
new dimensions.

During the 80s, the Shipyard began to produce large-sized yachts, also in aluminum. The first model is Al Fahedi, 44.82 meters long designed by arch. Gianni Zuccon. Then, the naval architect Alberto Mercati creates Adler, a 35-meter motor yacht that reaches 36 knots. They are the first mega yachts of the modern world, another record for Baglietto.

The future begins:
the large yachts.

From the pencil of Aldo Chichero, two boats that defined the concept of “series” for Baglietto were born. A production cured in the smallest details, which makes each piece unique.

The Maffy Blue model was launched in 1991; it measures 33 meters and reaches 30 knots of speed. It is a mega yacht with very luxurious interiors, an attractive design, and strong, sleek lines.

Two years later, Alba (30 meters) set sail from the Baglietto Shipyard. Alba has the same style and production that is now adopted.

1991
1990s

Francesco Paszkowski designs Opus, the first open yacht of 29 meters that can reach 40 knots. It is the beginning of a happy collaboration that continues today.

1994
1994

Baglietto acquires Cantieri Ferrari, based in La Spezia, and faces a new period of renewal and an increase in production capacity. Paszkowski designs the 30-meter yacht Charly Boy and, in 2001, Thunderball, the first 34-meter of the “Fast Yacht” series.

1996
1996

Models like RC were built in 2004 for Roberto Cavalli designed by Tommaso Spadolini and Tatiana per sempre. The 34-meter Blue Princess (2005) and the 42-meter Blue Scorpion were delivered the following year. Together with Bolaro, Apache II, Gitana, and Baraka.

2000s
THE 2000s
Sailing for
tomorrow.

In 2012, Baglietto Shipyard was acquired by the Gavio family, one of the most solid industrial family groups in Italy. The acquisition propelled a new journey for the Shipyard.

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